SAFE AND EFFECTIVE PRESCRIBING OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE

Autoreports to Auto Reports to CE Broker
$10.00
Credit Hours: 5.0 Hours

1 rating


Course Description

Introduction:

Physicians and, often, nurse practioners are able to prescribe controlled substances -medications which include stimulants, opioid analgesics, and sedative/hypnotics. These medicines, while frequently effective in treating various medical conditions, have a high potential for abuse. Practioners must stay alert to this abuse potential and ensure that they are aware of the federal regulations involved in prescribing these medications. While the prescribing of controlled substances is a sometimes necessary part of providing health care, there’s certainly a need for the review of our prescribing methods. From 1994 to 2014, sales of prescription opioids have nearly quadrupled, as have associated deaths from these medications.[1] While sales have increased, average reports of patient pain have not seen a similar rise.[2]

Course Objectives: Throughout this module, we’ll be covering several topics surrounding controlled substances. After reviewing this course, you’ll be able to:

  • Name and describe the necessary patient therapeutic uses and assessments for the popular classes of controlled substances.
  • Identify the best ways to initiate and monitor therapy for effectiveness while remaining alert to abuse in controlled substance use.
  • Observe for side effects and signs of overdose in patients taking sedatives and hypnotics, such as benzodiazepines, as well as stimulants, and opioid analgesics.
  • Understand how federal regulations impact the prescribing of benzodiazepines, opioid analgesics, and stimulants.
  • Teach patients, their families, and caregivers about the best way to use controlled substances safely.

[1]Paulozzi, MD L, Jones, PharmD C, Mack, PhD K, Rudd, MSPH R. Vital Signs: Overdoses of Prescription Opioid Pain Relievers — United States, 1999–2008. Cdcgov. 2017. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6043a4.htm?s_cid=mm6043a4_w%20-%20fig2. Accessed January 31, 2017.

[2]Chang H, Daubresse M, Kruszewski S, Alexander G. Prevalence and treatment of pain in EDs in the United States, 2000 to 2010. The American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2014;32(5):421-431. doi:10.1016/j.ajem.2014.01.015.

 

[1]Paulozzi, MD L, Jones, PharmD C, Mack, PhD K, Rudd, MSPH R. Vital Signs: Overdoses of Prescription Opioid Pain Relievers — United States, 1999–2008. Cdcgov. 2017. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6043a4.htm?s_cid=mm6043a4_w%20-%20fig2. Accessed January 31, 2017.

[1]Chang H, Daubresse M, Kruszewski S, Alexander G. Prevalence and treatment of pain in EDs in the United States, 2000 to 2010. The American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2014;32(5):421-431. doi:10.1016/j.ajem.2014.01.015.

 

Course Curriculum

  • Lessons  0/6

    • Controlled Substances: Descriptions, Therapeutic Uses, and Assessments for Prescribing
    • Understanding the “Scheduling” of Medications
    • Monitoring Controlled Substance Therapy
    • Recognizing Signs of Abuse
    • Ending Therapy with Controlled Substances
    • Review Your Understanding
  • Quiz - CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE  0/1

    • Quiz – CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE